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DIY: HMMWV X-Door Bolts

Hello all!

Thank you for taking the time to read this article.   This article promises to be low fat, NON-GMO, and gluten free; just kidding.  This is simply an educational page within which I share the bolts I personally purchase when replaced them on a “X-Door”.  This article is not intended to an exact parts list from the TM, just what I use.

With all of the above said, if you have better recommendations, please feel free to educate us.

My personal recommendation is for you to simply take apart your first door and store all of the bolts in a box.  Then, take those to a place such as Fastenal and have them replicate everything in that box.

Finally, if you don’t wish to get the bolts yourself and want someone else to do it for you, then  you can order a set of the bolts, nuts and washers I list below here.  Please know that it will be cheaper if you simply buy the bolts direct.

Let’s start with: window stop assembly

  • bolt: 1/4- 20 X 3/4″  Philips Drive Head grade 18-8 stainless steel.
    • You will need 4 of them
    • Fastenal part number is 1172590
  • nut: Wax 304SS Nylon 1/4-20NC
    • You will need 4 of them
    • Fastenal part number is 1170860
  • washers: 18-8 SS flat washer 1/4×5/8×9/32x.040
    • Note: These washers are slightly wider, so they will not fit behind the nut on the side for one of them nuts per side.
    • You will need 6 of them, normally you’ll need 8 but because of the with two of them won’t fit with the rail (from the inside / behind the nut).
    • Fastenal part number is 1171013

door Lock

  • bolt: 1/4- 20 X 1-1/2″  Philips Drive Head grade 18-8 stainless steel.
    • You will need 4 of them
    • Fastenal part number is 1172597
  • nut: Wax 304SS Nylon 1/4-20NC
    • You will need 4 of them
    • Fastenal part number is 1170860
  • washers: 18-8 SS flat washer 1/4×5/8×9/32x.040
    • You will need 8 of them
    • Fastenal part number is 1171013

door handle

  • bolt: #80-30X1″ S/S Pan Head 7’th.
    • You will need 4 of them
    • Fastenal part number is 1172418
  • nut: Wax 304SS Nylon Nut #8-32NC
    • You will need 4 of them
    • Fastenal part number is 1170856
  • washers: 304 SS flat washer #8x.375x.174x.031
    • You will need 8 of them
    • Fastenal part number is 1171007

door hinges

  • bolt: 1/4- 20 X 1-1/2″  Philips Drive Head grade 18-8 stainless steel.
    • You will need 6 of them
    • Fastenal part number is 1172597
  • nut: Wax 304SS Nylon 1/4-20NC
    • You will need 6 of them
    • Fastenal part number is 1170860
  • washers: 18-8 SS flat washer 1/4×5/8×9/32x.040
    • You will need 12 of them
    • Fastenal part number is 1171013

door arm rest / latch assembly

  • bolt: 8-32 x 1/2 SS Philips pan head
    • You will need 4 of them
    • Fastenal part number is 2172398
  • nut: N/A
  • washers: 8-32
    • You will need 4 of them
    • Fastenal part number 1171007

Note: If you have found a different part number that works better please let me know and I will update the post.

Note: Price on these parts will depend on where you get them, you should expect to pay a lot more when going to places like Home Depot vs Fastenal…

Part Unit Cnt
1172590 4
1170860 18
1171013 26
1172597 10
1172418 4
1170856 4
1171007 12
2172398 4

Thank you for reading this article.  If you enjoyed it, then please comment and share.

Check out trucks that Damage Control Customs has to offer here.

Click here for parts offered by Damage Control Customs here.

Click here for a consolidated HMMWV how to articles and videos.

If you have any questions please feel free to reach out directly or fill out the form below and you will be contacted.

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HMMWV Cartoon

Check out some of these cool pictures.  I’m having fun turning my HMMWV pictures into cartoon pictures.

I’ve had the pleasure of working on all of these HMMWVs. Turned them from a tough machine to a work of art!

 

 

 

 

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OctaneMarch2019

How do you not return when everyone there loves you.

 

I have been been at the Caffeine and Octane show several times and I must say it’s one of my favorite events.  They always treat me nice.  Everyone there loves my trucks. And best of all lots and lots of people visiting.

 

I got to see everything from cute Jeeps, to muscle cars, to fast cars, even cars from Russia.

 

As you you can imagine I took MasterCraft to the show.

 

Below you you can check out some of the pictures I took.

 

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Custom Hood Grills

Special announcement

 

As promised, this week we would like to disclose our reveal of a special hood grill for the HMMWV.   

But before we do, a quick reminder. By now everyone knows that DamageControlCustoms.com was the first to introduce special HMMWV hood grills.  I’m sure everyone also knows that we make similar items for 5 ton and can make custom grills with your desired logo.   So, if you would like any of our standard designs for your 5 Ton, or if you would like a custom one made just for you, then please feel free to reach out to us directly. 

With all that said, here is our official reveal of our new custom grill.  We have pre-made only 4 of these for sale but based on demand we will produce more.  You can be one of the very first ones to own it by order here.

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We also have other designs ready to ship.  You can order any one of these variations here

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HMMWV Missions

According to Defense Blog our beloved HMMWV actually performs more mission roles than any other tactical vehicle in the world.  What do you think,  do you think that’s true?  Also, if you served, then what vehicle did you use during your missions?  Leave a comment below and let us know.

When I served, I primarily served on board the USS Constellation, known as America’s Flag Ship. She cost over $265 million to commission back in 1961. Our missions were primarily linked to bombing runs. In fact, during Operation Iraqi Freedom we delivered/dropped 1.7 million pounds of ordinance. I know that the Ship isn’t a tactical vehicle but that’s what my experience was.  What was yours? Leave a comment.

HMMWV trivia, v2 rev

 

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Installing a turret

I’m going to share some of my experiences and lessons learned on how to install a turret for your slant back HMMWV.

Here is a quick video of everything below.

You first want to select your turret setup.  Make sure you have the right bearing, the right turret support.  If you have an older style turret with a smaller bearing you may want to think twice before adding a heavy coupla or shield.   Also, before getting started, make sure you currently have a c-pillar, if not you can get one here.

I like to start off with the turret support.  Scrape off all of the old gunk, grind and sand.

Then you want to disassemble your hatch.  Make sure to take lots of pictures because you will need them as a point of reference upon assembling.  Take all of your bolts to your local Fastenal or tractor supply and purchase brand new stainless hardware. Do yourself a favor and don’t go to lows and other such stores, you will be hard pressed to find everything you’ll need and you’ll pay a lot more.  Make sure to buy extras of each nut and bolt, you will lose some.  Once you have it completely disassembled, go ahead and start sanding each component one by one.

Once you have everything sanded and prepped. Then, move to priming and paint.  In my case I’m using tan primer.  Also, the interior of my truck will be green while the exterior will be tan, so I will have to pay attention to what I paint what color.  Finally, make sure to use the right kind of primer based on the paint you’ll be using.  If paining with CARC, the you will have to use the correct primer with the epoxy.  If you need details on this, then message me and I will be more than happy to give you the details.

Then, remove your roof and if necessary remove your old insulation.  If necessary, then use Polyurethane Sealant to close the gaps between where the roof lines meet.

You can find the sealant here:

Polyurethane Sealant in Aluminum Gray 
Polyurethane Sealant in White 
Polyurethane Sealant in Redwood Tan 

Then spray on your adhesive on your roof and insulation.  You want to go vertically, then go over it again horizontally.  Lesson learned, cut out where your support and b-pillar come into contact with your insulation.  Otherwise, your roof will not sit low enough.

Here is the Spray Adhesive for the roof insulation, you may want to get 3-4 cans of this

Next you want to install your c-pillar.  To do that, you will have to remove one of your sponsons, slide in your c-pillar, make sure the bolts line up, and reinstall your sponson.  The you want to install your support.  Followed your roof.  Finally your lock rings.

Once you’re happy with the fit of the roof and turret support then you want to run some of the sealant around where the roof and support meet.  Then place your bearing over the support and apply sealant again.  Attached a few bolts to hold the bearing close to the support and  leg that dray over night.

On the follow day, you want to create a gasket to go under roof retainers.  To do that, you can buy a large sheet of 1/8 gasket, you can buy shower liner, or you can use bike tire tubes.  I would discourage using bike tire tubes because I believe that would be harder to work with.  You can buy the shower liner, which is what I used, here.

You want to make sure your gasket is big enough to go passed your roof retainers, you can go back and cut it to exact fit once everything is dry.  You also want to add s’more more of your sealant under your gasket as well as under and around your roof retainers.  You want to go around the whole turret support and make sure your roof retainers are on nice and tight.  Leave this again over night.

Note:

(1) this sealant will not be 100% day in 24 hours but will be dry enough to work with.

(2) make sure not to add sealant on the bearing and the gasket you just made, the gasket can temporarily go onto the bearing but you will want to come back and trim it just passed where the bearing spins.

Now you can start to assemble your hatch back together.  Remember those pictures you took before taking it apart? This is when it will come in handy.

Again, here is a quick video of everything above

Finally, a huge thank you to those who continue to train me.  In this specific build, I have to thank Todd.  I think we both educated each other but I had a lot more to learn.